Kids, Food, & How to Kill a Chicken, Improvised.

Poultry chart via etsy

My kids, overall, are good eaters. I won’t go into my philosophy in detail just that I take a French-mother/Man Who Ate Everything approach to feeding them. It seems to be working for us –despite the occasional protests.

One thing I have always tried to do is make sure my girls know where their food comes from. I do not want to find myself, burger in hand, facing my kid around 12 suddenly stricken with a look of horror saying:

Wait you mean burgers and cows are the same thing? So what was the animal we ate last night?

Me: Well we had venison so you could say we ate Bambi, well probably her mother.

Living in Thailand has made this pretty easy. Granted, we have not passed Daisy the cow on our way to ballet class, but we have waved hello to many other edible friends. I knew I was succeeding  with my mission when upon seeing new animals, SweetPea would point to the creature going by and ask first:

What is that

followed closely with

Can we eat it?

Both girls love chicken but for SweetPea, it’s an obsession. She will choose chicken over any other food including sweets and cake any day so chicken features pretty regularly on our menu.

While eating chicken for dinner the other night:

P: Maman why can’t I see the chicken’s blood?
Me: Well they remove it before they sell us the chicken.
P: How do they remove it?
Me: They cut the chicken’s head off and hang him upside down.
(At this point I know that chickens get heads cut off and pigs are bled so I am just trying to piece this together)
P: Like this? (Showing me with her dragon piggy bank conveniently located next to her).
I nod in agreement.
P: Maman can I please do that next time we have chicken for dinner? And how do we catch a chicken?
Me, quiet worrying about a Dexter in our house.
P: And I want the chicken blood.
Me, thinking it is time to redirect this conversation: Well how about some boudin noir which is blood sausage?

Close call.

The next day, I worried as we head out of the house. There’s been a trio of scrawny birds hanging out by the front of our mobaan –a cluster of houses, like a little village. I didn’t want SweetPea getting any ideas. Fortunately the chickens were so scrawny. They were like the Kate Moss of chickens: breast-less, always in black, and in need a good meal and long night of sleep. I figured she wouldn’t find them appetizing enough to want to make the kill.

Right, I must brush up on my art of butchering skills. Til the next time readers.

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11 thoughts on “Kids, Food, & How to Kill a Chicken, Improvised.

  1. One of my most memorable memories was watching my mom slaughter chickens in the backyard of our California suburban home. I thought I would be scarred for life when I saw the chicken still running with it’s head cut off until the next day when I saw my mom pull the tupperware dish of gelatinous blood out of the fridge to eat. Is your daughter part Mexican? ;)

  2. I know I should be taking notes and taking my kids out to the farm after reading this, but the truth is that I am 100% one of those people who cannot think about where food comes from or else I won’t eat for a week. So….I am basically screwed. Guess I’ll start planning to go vegetarian in about 8 years.

    • Given the difficulty (or impossibility) of knowing where one’s meat comes from here –unlike my lovely food coop back in Brooklyn– we’ve greatly veered towards a vegetarian diet. So when the time is right, I’ll have plenty of recipes to share!

  3. My husband always talks about anatomy at the dinner table and where animals come from, what part of it we are eating. The kids are just use to it. He is also going to school to be an Agriculture Science Teacher so that stuff is interesting to him. Great post!

  4. Pingback: Kids, Food, & How to Kill a Chicken, Improvised | BLUNTmoms

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